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Your flights to Lukla from Kathmandu may be diverted to Ramechhap Airport. Here’s Why!

Your flights to Lukla from Kathmandu may be diverted to Ramechhap Airport. Here’s Why!

Volunteers Story about Batase Village and Chitwan National Park

4/7/2014

We worked with the kids to understand different verbs and emotions so we would exaggerate like crazy to demonstrate happy (point to smile), sad(wipe away tears), angry (arms crossed). We also did jumping, walking, kicking, punching, waving and other different actions outside in the game. While we were outside we also taught them to play over and under or tunnel ball. The kids took on to it pretty quick and they very much enjoyed it.

5/7/2014

We got out our colours today and got the kids to write and say different colours. We also got out some books of different items that are red and we recited them. Had a few more games involving colouring shapes that were the correct colour.

Then we went through revision and many people did remember a lot of their colours. We went through the subjects that we had previously taught and we were delighted what the kids had retained. That night we had a party around a campfire, played music and danced.

6/7/2014

Today we had our final day. We planned it to be a fun day with different stations. The game we contributed was tunnel ball. We also had painting, hula hoops, singing and craft making. With each of us watching a different group and rotating every thirty minutes, it made each of us feel pretty comfortable with doing the routine. Hamish and I were the ones watching the group with the tunnel ball, but we had to adapt with every age level.

We had to demonstrate more with the younger groups for the kindergartners and the grades 1-3. As the later grades understood English better it was easy to pass information over to them. We also had to spice it up a bit with the older grades as they got bored quickly. We picked a new leader every so often and shuffle the line forward every so often as for some reason we got closer and closer to the school house. Afterwards we had a ceremony to say goodbye.

The night before, also, we had to choose a person from our class who stood out amongst their peers. We chose a girl and a boy and worked together to get the certificates sorted out with bright colours and big letters saying “You’re a star!” That was pretty accurate watching those kids in the week we had been there.

8/7/2014

Throughout the week Som was telling us that if we get a really good shower for the rice fields, we will go out and plant the rice for the villages. There we some downpours, but not enough to start planting paddies. We finally got one. Today!

We woke up and had breakfast as usual and dusted off our bags and began to sort and pile our belongings into the suit cases. The rain came down and did not stop for hours. Thankfully there wasn’t much on the line and we could pack without issues. We sat down for a while and waited out the weather. It subsided somewhat and we began our goodbyes. We had really grown attached to the girls and the children there in the lodge so there was some tears shed on both sides. We started to hike to the meeting spot for the buses to take us back to Kathmandu.

We hiked along through several villages and a road until we got to the village with the school with the God poem on the side. We had a rest there and took some photos with the girls. We talked about hobbies and experiences. We hiked through the forest which was not unlike the rainforests in Cairns, but much more cooler. One of the girls asked about Australia. I told her about the people there and a summary of the history of the place and some of its connections with Asia. There we several dense patches with vines and many narrow pathways, down ditches and around thick trees. We finally stopped on a road by a waterfall. Som pointed out that the water from the stream was the best kind you could get and many filled up their bottles for the final leg of the journey. We also came across two poles which were standing parallel to each other. Turns out that they were used to play beach volleyball!

We continued to take the road. The mist had cleared by now and we could see all around the valley. Phoenix went back quickly to grab some water as she had forgotten. We passed several houses by the road that were suspended on stilts and some shrines. We got to a path by the road and began our decent. As we were high and the sky was clear, Som could make out the bus waiting for us.

We talked about things as we went down the path and I recognised a few Asian plants that we had in our gardens in Australia. Including Latana! Eventually we met level ground and we took it easy observing the rice paddies and some of the gardens and rocks that were arranged. Some of which you would definitely see in a travel agency or a post card.

We crossed a stream that ran through the rice paddies and found our place on the bus. We began our ride on the criss-crossing roads to the Capital city. Some of us tried to sleep, but we kept being jolted awake by the bus. I gave up and stuck to listening to music and reading. A few people had snacks that they passed around. We stopped at a place on the way to eat some Chow Mein and drink some Sprite. We got back to Kathmandu and when we got to a certain point in the city where the bus pulled over and we piled off like a bunch of SAS. We dragged and carried our bags to the new hotel the backyard Hotel. There we grabbed our keys and got to our rooms for a good night rest. But not before a meal and a hot shower!

9/7/2014

Well after breakfast many of us decided to go walkabouts for shopping and bars. I decided to just chill out after breakfast and then meet up for lunch. We sat down for lunch and then Phoenix brought up the idea to go an aircraft around Mount Everest and experience it while we were in the area. We all agreed to put in about three thousand rupees for the trip. I was a little concerned for my finances, but I told myself that if I kept my money for the essentials I would be right.

Had to dig up all the hiding places of my bag to find the different packs of cash, count them and then put them back to make sure that I wouldn’t go broke. I still had fifty dollars in Aussie dollars as back up so I was right. After lunch I asked for Som to put in a call for my parents to ring the hotel so I could talk to them. Unfortunately it didn’t get through so I went to do something else. I went to a masseurs house called “Seeing hands”. If you’re in Kathmandu I would really recommend it. The masseurs are all blind and feel tight parts of your body with their fingers.

I went there feeling “here it goes…”, I never had a real massage from a professional before let alone a blind man. After a week in a village school, the results were terrific! They dug deep to get to the knots and tight muscles, but I felt much more relaxed and mobile afterwards.

I went to bed early and most of the rest of the group went clubbing.

10/7/2014

We got up to take a 8 hour bus drive to the southernmost province of Nepal in Chitwan where we would experience the world heritage listed national park. We stocked up on some sweets, drinks and energy bars the previous day so that was no trouble. We swapped stories, listened and sang to different music.

We got to Chitwan and we were greeted by Tuk tuks, horse and carts, and ELEPHANTS! Some were being ridden through the streets while others were under shelters being cared for by attendants. The hotel we stayed in was borderline between 4 and 5 star so it was really comfortable. Afterwards we were introduced to our guide. We had lunch of rice, roast chicken and sweet and sour sauce. Nice! Made a difference to Dal Baht or noodles.

We were told to get back to our rooms and prepare for an afternoon trek to the elephant sanctuary. As we got closer to the sanctuary, our guide pointed out some of the buildings that were made of large grasses, mud and thatched roofs. The area was inhabited by the Taruo People who moved down from the mountains after Malaria was eradicated in the 60’s. At the sanctuary, the elephants were very docile although some were a little dismayed to see them in chains.

The guide stood us in a circle and gave us some general information about the elephants in this area. While he was doing that, one of the bulls tossed a clump of grass. It went Woosh over Brody’s head and landed in the centre causing us to all jump reactively. We all laughed and decided to give the elephants our full attention from then on.

We went for a small walk afterwards. The guide said that there should be a rhino around the river. The recent rain had made the ground boggy, even though the forest and grasslands were beautiful. Those that didn’t bother to bring the proper shoes quickly regretted it.

Anyway when the forest cleared and the river came into view we saw a rhino rising from the shallows. The guide instructed to maintain our distance and not make any sudden moves. We took a lot of pictures as it came out of the water and slowly walked about.

We slowly walked away and took a trail by the river. The guide said to keep our eyes peeled for gharials and alligators, but we didn’t get a good look at one for a photo. We did see some deer though we watched them through a pair of binoculars, they were really magnificent. As the sun began to descend over the mountains we started back to the hotel, but not before we said to one of the elephants resting under its shelter.

We slept well that night. To say the least.

11/7/2014

Well, Early next morning after breakfast, we piled into a jeep and headed to the river. We could see that there were people riding on the backs of elephants so that’s what we thought we were doing. In reality we were going to the elephants later, first we would be going for a ride in a canoe. The boats were all made out of a carved wood. We had some timber seats to lean against and we got comfortable. The rowers both used long poles to take us down the river. We saw several birds such as kingfishers and a flock of peacocks roosting in a tree. It was very peaceful despite the guide’s word that there were alligators in the river. Eventually we got to our destination. A smooth bank on the side of the river we all piled out onto the grass in front of the forest, and our guide pointed out the path where we were going to enter.

He told us a bit about the forest saying that we may or may not see many rhinos, deer or other animals. We began our hike through the jungle. Our interest was piped when the guided pointed out a footprint left by a rhinoceros. The forest was very beautiful with its large tall trees and peaceful atmosphere, but the only animals we saw were the birds, insects and some impressive termite mounds. The crossings across the creeks were large planks of wood, which were quite precarious when you crossed over them.

We rested at a small look out post which was, unfortunately, closed to the public. When we got out of the jungle, we came out near another elephant sanctuary. We rested at a tourist hut and read about the elephants history and anatomy. We had a look around afterwards at the elephants. There was a baby elephant running around and we got a chance to pet it. Although it could be dangerous if it felt boxed in. I had to get out of the way a few times!

Afterwards we continued walking and crossed a river via a ferry with the carved wood canoes. We got back to the resort and had a lunch and a rest until the afternoon.

We got up eagerly for the elephant rides!

11/7/2014

Well, Early next morning after breakfast, we piled into a jeep and headed to the river. We could see that there were people riding on the backs of elephants so that’s what we thought we were doing. In reality we were going to the elephants later, first we would be going for a ride in a canoe. The boats were all made out of a carved wood. We had some timber seats to lean against and we got comfortable. The rowers both used long poles to take us down the river.
We saw several birds such as kingfishers and a flock of peacocks roosting in a tree. It was very peaceful despite the guide’s word that there were alligators in the river. Eventually we got to our destination. A smooth bank on the side of the river we all piled out onto the grass in front of the forest, and our guide pointed out the path where we were going to enter.

He told us a bit about the forest saying that we may or may not see many rhinos, deer or other animals. We began our hike through the jungle. Our interest was piped when the guided pointed out a footprint left by a rhinoceros. The forest was very beautiful with its large tall trees and peaceful atmosphere, but the only animals we saw were the birds, insects and some impressive termite mounds.

The crossings across the creeks were large planks of wood, which were quite precarious when you crossed over them. We rested at a small look out post which was, unfortunately, closed to the public. When we got out of the jungle, we came out near another elephant sanctuary. We rested at a tourist hut and read about the elephants history and anatomy. We had a look around afterwards at the elephants. There was a baby elephant running around and we got a chance to pet it. Although it could be dangerous if it felt boxed in. I had to get out of the way a few times!

Afterwards we continued walking and crossed a river via a ferry with the carved wood canoes. We got back to the resort and had a lunch and a rest until the afternoon.

We got up eagerly for the elephant rides!

We drove to a little place with dozens of elephants hanging around a large elevated platform. We would climb up the steps to the top and up onto the small platform on the elephants back and make ourselves comfortable around one of the four corners of the fence of the platform. The movement of the elephant was a slow up and down like being in a boat. It began to walk through the river. It was quite amazing to see the water creeping up the side. We ascended up the bank and began to walk through the jungle. The elephants all went through at different routes. We saw several bird species such as kingfishers and jungle fowl. We also saw some deer running around the place. We had to be wary of low branches.

The best way to view the jungle: Riding peacefully on the back of an elephant.

We came out into a place similar to savannah land. Several of the elephants began to trumpet each other and then two suddenly began racing towards each other. There was a tense moment. We thought that they were going for each other. At the last moment they came about and turned around. Each one covering each other’s back. The keeper on the neck said that they had picked up the scent of a tiger and reacted defensively to the recent tracks. That was pretty exciting.
We waved to other team members as they went past and exchanged photos.

After we got back we had a quick tea and then went out to another event. A Tauro cultural show. We came to a dance house later in the evening. There were several dances involving dances with clacking sticks and later one involving a man dressed up as a peacock imitating the movements of the bird showing off its tail.

The Climax was a dance in which everyone could get involved with. We went up there and joined in.

It was so incredible moving with the dancers. We felt so alive!

It was a great day to finish our time in Nepal.

After that it was rest days, gift shopping and writing home.

It was a great way to finish off our trip.

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